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November 2013

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Nov. 10th, 2013

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Pecos Valley Diamonds

PECOS VALLEY DIAMONDS


New Mexico, one of the nation’s most mineralized states, contains a very large quantity quartz (Si02) . ” This ubiquitous mineral occurs in every district and in many forms. The crystals known as “Pecos Valley ‘Diamonds” however, are found only in the Pecos River Valley, an area 20 miles wide and a north-south distance of about 100 miles; centering in Roswell, New Mexico.

During the Permian time of the Paleozoic era (300,000,000 years ago) the great Capitan Barrier Reef grew, trapping the Permian Sea, Evaporation of the sea left the gypsum beds of the Permian-Whitehorse formation. Time and erosion have released the quartz crystals embedded in the gypsum where they had originally crystallized. These crystals occur as doubly terminated hexagonal prisms. Although generally small, crystals up to several inches in length are known -some are semi-transparent, but the majority are translucent to opaque. They vary from colorless to white, pink, yellow, orange, red, green, brown, and black shades. Although quartz replacing gypsum is not uncommon, the development of such doubly terminated crystals by its replacement is unusual.

The “diamonds” were first observed and recorded in 1583 by Don Antonio de Espejo, one of the Spanish new world explorers. It is known that they were used as drills by the early cliff dwellers of the southwest region (they have a hardness of seven). Latter day Indians used them as ceremonial tools and for jewelry. In some areas along the Pecos River Valley, when the rays of the western sun are slanted, the innumerable brilliant sparkles give the impression that the desert is literally paved with diamonds; these then are the Diamonds of the Pecos Valley.

Original card from out-of-business rock shop: pecos-valley-diamonds



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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

Oct. 27th, 2013

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Niagara River

070313-053


Niagara River

A massive river that flows between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie for approximately 35 miles in length. It is home to the famous “Niagara Falls” both on the U.S. and Canadian sides. It is dotted with falls, whirlpools, and rapids along its course. There are also several islands along the run of the river: The two largest and most popular are the Navy Island and the Grand Island. Other popular ones include Goat Island, Luna Island, and Squaw Island. The river forms the border between Ontario, Canada and New York, USA. Many legends amiss around the river, as does its name origin. An Iroquois belief is it was named after a branch of the Neutral Confederacy called the “Niagagarega” in the late 17th century. Others state it was named after the Iroquois village “Ongniaahra” or “point of land cut in two”. Today the river is dotted with, especially within the Falls area, hydroelectric power stations. The two most famous of which is the Sir Adam Beck Hydro-electric Power Station in Canada and the Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant in the U.S.A. It was America’s first waterway to harness large scale hydro-electricity. Ships coming down the Niagara River use the Welland Canal of the Saint Lawrence Seaway to bypass the Falls. The Falls drop over 325 feet along its gorge fallway. It has two tributaries – the Welland River and Tonawanda Creek which were adapted into Canals for ship traffic such as the Erie Canal and the Welland Canal. The first European exploits of the area begin in the 17th century with French explorer Father Louis Hennepin published in the 1698 “A New Discovery of a Vast Country in America”. Some of the first railways built in America were built along this river, including the inclined wooden tramway built by John Montresor in 1764 called “The Cradles” and “The Old Lewiston Incline”. The River has seen its share of battles and wars, including ones between Fort Niagara (U.S.) and Ft. George (Canada) during the French and Indian War, American Revolution, Battle of Queenston Heights, and War of 1812. It was also very important during the American Civil War as a point where slaves crossed via the Underground Railway to Canada.


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070313-050


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070313-052


070313-055



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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

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Oct. 1st, 2012

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Olive Jar


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


Olive Jar
Produced from 1490 to 1900 CE, originating in Spain

The “Olive Jar” or tinajas, peruleras, or botijas are a very common storage or shipping vessel type and classification found throughout the world, especially from Spain to Mexico, the Carribean, and other Spanish colonies. It was commonly used as a shipping container from Spain to the New World. The shape evolved through time evolving in shape and manufacturing techniques. The pottery is usually a unglazed coarse earthenware with a buff off-white to tan or light orange paste with grit or heavy sand tempering. Vessels are a amphoroidal jar and can have a green lead glaze covering a portion of the vessel. The ceramic can be split up into different styles including generic, early, middle, or late style. Ceramic type is written about by Deagan (1987), Goggin (1960), Marken (1994), and Avery (1997).


Florida Museum of Natural History’s Guide to Ceramics: Generic Olive Jar, Early Style, Late Style, and Middle Style.

Early style olive jar ware:


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida




Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


“Ship wreck artifacts: from Florida’s coast. (1) Early style olive jar fragment: early style olive jars had two handles. this fragment was recovered from an eighteenth century shipwreck off Florida’s coast. (2) Majolica fragments, Columbia Plain type: Columbia Plain was a common majolica type manufactured from 1492-1650 CE. (3) Lead-glazed earthenware pot. (4) Ceramic fragments, Green Basin type: Green basin pottery, a lead glazed earthenware, had a green colored glaze on the vessel’s interior. The type dates to the 16th century. (5) El Morro ware fragments: this common lead glazed pottery, known as El Morro ware, was in use from about 1550 to 1770 CE. The term “El Morro” was derived by a Florida reearcher and generally is not used outside of Florida. (6) El Morro ware fragments. (7) El Morro water rim fragment. (8) Olive jar – this earthenware jar was recovered from an 18th century shipwreck off Florida’s coast. its form is similar to olive jars used in the 16th century. Its surface is covered partially with barnacle shells. barnacles are sea animals that attach to underwater objects. (9) Olive jar: although this example is from an 18th century shipwreck off Florida’s coast .. its shape is typical of the late 16th century. ” ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-55.jpg) Ship Wreck artifacts: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=277 (Expected publication January 2013).



Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida



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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

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Columbia Plain type Majolica


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


Columbia Plain type Majolica


Produced from 1490 to 1565 CE, originating in Spain

Also known as Columbia Plain green dipped, this Majolica originated in Spain and was spread throughout the Carribean via trade and use. It is very similar to Columbia Plain except a portion of the vessel is covered with a green (light, grass, or turquoise) lead glaze applied usually by dipping over a off-white cream or grey/white tin enameled ceramic. Small fragments are found that may be totally covered with the green glaze that could actually be another lead-glazed ware – so classification needs to be considered. Often used with bowls, escudilla, jars, and plato. appliqued appendages sometimes have vertical I-shaped lug handles. This pottery classification is written about by Deagan (1987), Fairbanks (1973), Goggin (1968), and Lister n’ Lister (1982).


Florida Museum of Natural History Pottery Classification Guide: Columbia Plain type Majolica


    “Ship wreck artifacts: from Florida’s coast. (2) Majolica fragments, Columbia Plain type: Columbia Plain was a common majolica type manufactured from 1492-1650 CE. (3) Lead-glazed earthenware pot. ” ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-55.jpg) Ship Wreck artifacts: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=277 (Expected publication January 2013).



Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida



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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

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Lead Glazed Earthenware


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


Lead glazed Earthenware
Produced from 1490 to 1900 C.E., Unknown origin


This is a generic basic lead glazed coarse earthenware found in archaeological sites throughout the Carribean (through trade) and Florida (USA).

It has a coarse earthenware paste that is usually tempered with sand and ranges in color from red to buff. It is found often with a smooth reflective finish and the clear glazes allow the paste color to show through with pigmented glazes imparting a different color to the surface with colored glazes ranging from brownish green to regular green. Some are found decorated with quickly applied lines and loops often in manganese brown color. The types of vessels made from this pottery type were often bacins, bowls, jars, lebrillo, and plato. Those that can’t be classified by most of the currently distinquished identifiable types fall in this category as found on Spanish colonial sites from the 16th-20th century. Deagan has written about this classification (2002).


Florida Museum of Natural History Ceramic Classification: Lead glazed Earthenware


“Ship wreck artifacts: from Florida’s coast. (1) Early style olive jar fragment: early style olive jars had two handles. this fragment was recovered from an eighteenth century shipwreck off Florida’s coast. (2) Majolica fragments, Columbia Plain type: Columbia Plain was a common majolica type manufactured from 1492-1650 CE. (3) Lead-glazed earthenware pot. (4) Ceramic fragments, Green Basin type: Green basin pottery, a lead glazed earthenware, had a green colored glaze on the vessel’s interior. The type dates to the 16th century. (5) El Morro ware fragments: this common lead glazed pottery, known as El Morro ware, was in use from about 1550 to 1770 CE. The term “El Morro” was derived by a Florida reearcher and generally is not used outside of Florida. (6) El Morro ware fragments. (7) El Morro water rim fragment. (8) Olive jar – this earthenware jar was recovered from an 18th century shipwreck off Florida’s coast. its form is similar to olive jars used in the 16th century. Its surface is covered partially with barnacle shells. barnacles are sea animals that attach to underwater objects. (9) Olive jar: although this example is from an 18th century shipwreck off Florida’s coast .. its shape is typical of the late 16th century. ” ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-55.jpg) Ship Wreck artifacts: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=277 (Expected publication January 2013).



Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida



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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

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Green Bacin/Basin Ware


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


Green Bacin/Basin Ware
From: Spain, common in the Carribean, Florida. Produced from 1490 – 1600 CE

The Green Bacin or Green Lebrillo ceramic type is originally from Spain and was exchanged through trade throughout the Carribean and Florida. It was produced from 1490-1600 of the Common Era, and was used in heavy bodied, larger vessels such as bacin, lebrillo, mortars, and platters. Most vessels were massive with widely varying rim diameters found up to 52 centimeters with an average thickness of up to 7 centimeters. The flat upper surfaces of the rims were often stamped with a design similar to an olive branch with leaves. It came off with a buff to light orange paste color and a emerald green opaque tin-lead glaze. It was a lead glazed coarse earthenware. As a pottery type classification it is written about by both Goggin (1968) and Deagan (2002).


    “Ship wreck artifacts: from Florida’s coast. (4) Ceramic fragments, Green Basin type: Green basin pottery, a lead glazed earthenware, had a green colored glaze on the vessel’s interior. The type dates to the 16th century. ” ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-55.jpg) Ship Wreck artifacts: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=277 (Expected publication January 2013).




Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida



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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

Sep. 30th, 2012

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El Morro Ware



Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


El Morro Ware
1550 C.E. to 1770 C.E.
Common: Iberia, Mexico; the Carribean region; North Florida, U.S.A.


Florida Museum of Natural History Ceramic Guide: El Morro Ware

El Morro ware is a lead glazed coarse earthenware from most likely originates from Iberia, Mexico and was produced from 1550-1700 CE. It is poorly compacted, sand-tempered, coarse earthenware that can range in color from a reddish brown to a cream or beige tint. The surface of the pottery is minimally smoothed with a thin, transparent lead glaze that was applied to at least one, if not both surfaces. The sand tempering is obvious due to the common protrusions into the glaze giving a gritty or granular surface and is often a yellow orange, green or rust color. Common vessels found are pitchers, plato, taza, escudilla, bowls, and bacins. It sticks out as “El Morro” from other lead glazed earthenware common from Spanish and Carribean sites in the 16th century due to the gritty texture, and thin transparent glaze with a poorly smoothed surface. Both Smith (1962) and Deagan (1987) have written classifications for this pottery type.



Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida




    “Ship wreck artifacts: from Florida’s coast. (5) El Morro ware fragments: this common lead glazed pottery, known as El Morro ware, was in use from about 1550 to 1770 CE. The term “El Morro” was derived by a Florida reearcher and generally is not used outside of Florida. (6) El Morro ware fragments. (7) El Morro water rim fragment. ” ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-55.jpg) Ship Wreck artifacts: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=277 (Expected publication January 2013).



    Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


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    Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

Sep. 23rd, 2012

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Common Sunflowers: Helianthus annuus



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico


Sunflowers a.k.a. “Common Sunflower”, “Mirasol”, “Kansas Sunflower”

Helianthus annuus

Localitie: Located throughout the western and southern United States, Southern Canada, and Northern Mexico. They are native to meadows, roadsides, foothills, prairies, and dry plains preferring well drained soils.

Description: The Common sunflower is a large roadside plant that grows off a coarse, hairy, leafy large stalk with stiff branching upright stems ranging in height from 3-9 feet tall, producing 3-6″ orange-yellow rayed flower heads containing numerous seeds in their brown-purple center disks flowering in summer annually. Common along fences, fields, ditches, roads, trackways, and waste areas especially in the Americas west of the Mississippi. Over the last 3,000 years, Native American and European cultivation of the plant has altered the size and seeds a thousand fold. These have become their own domesticated variety.

Cultivation: Best grown in moist, average well-drained soils under full sun exposure. They can also do well in poor soils, that are on the dry side, as long as full sunlight is granted. Best to plant after the last frost date for the area. The Sunflower was first domesticated by the Amerindians from the regions of southern Canada, western/southern America, and northern Mexico for food. It is believed that the Sunflower was first cultivated by the Native Americans, then spread from Mexico to Spain, onward to Europe, to the Russians, and finally to the European colonists in the New World.

Culinary: Domesticated by Native Americans for thousands of years, the sunflower was used in a variety of cooking methods. The seeds were roasted, cooked, dried, ground, or eaten raw, or pressed to create sunflower oil. The seeds can be roasted and ground to make a coffee substitution. Flower buds are boiled and eaten or added to dishes.

Common Uses: Sunflowers are used as ornamentals and for herbal gardens with companion planting. Black and purple dyes are made from the plant to dye baskets. The ray flowers are used to make a yellow dye. The dyes would be used to dye fabric, basketry, or body paint. Infusions from the seeds have been used as a flea repellent. Stalks are used as fodder for livestock, poultry/livestock food, fuel, and ensilage. Russians use the hulls to manufacture furfural and ethyl alcohol, growing yeast, and lining plywood, or for commercial fiber. Others use it for fiber in plants and paper manufacture.

Cultural and Mythological: State flower of Kansas. The Sunflower is the common name but the Latin Genus species “Helianthus” comes from the Greek word “helios anthos” which translates to “Sun flower”. The species “annuus” means “annual”. The Hopi Indians believe that when sunflowers are numerous, it is a sign that there will be an abundant harvest. The Teton Dakota say that when the sunflowers are tall and in full bloom, the buffalo are ready for hunt as they are fat with good meat. The Iroquois tribe of North America incorporate sunflowers as part of their creation myth. The Spanish explorer Francisco Hernandez claimed that sunflower held aphrodisiac powers. The Rees, Mandan, and Gros Ventres made an oil from the seeds to lubricate and paint the face and body for ceremony, and also ate the seeds as a stimulant for war or hunting parties to alleviate fatigue. The Navajo used the plant for sun sand painting ceremonies and as a disinfectant preventing pre-natal infections caused by solar phenomena such as eclipses. they also pulverized seeds and roots together to make a salve to apply in order to prevent a horse from falling on a person, and as a moxa of the pith to remove warts. The flowers are worn in the hair of various tribal women (such as the Hopi in Arizona) for ceremonies.

Medicinal: Europeans used the plant as a remedy for pulmonary issues, the seeds for coughs and colds, as a substitute for quinine treating malaria, as well as a expectorant and diuretic. In Mexico, it is believed that sunflowers when eaten was good to soothe chest pains. The Pima would make a poultice from the warm ashes of burnt sunflowers and apply to the stomach to get rid of worms and a decoction from the leaves to stop high fevers. The Dakota would boil the flower heads, separate the involucrul bracts, and create a remedy for pulmonary issues. The Cochiti would make a juice from crushing the sunflower stems and apply them to cuts and wounds to speed healing. Cherokee made an infusion of the leaves to treat kidneys and the Dakota for chest pains and pulmonary troubles. Pawnee women ate a concoction made from dry seeds to protect suckling children from infections. Hopi used the plant for skin issues and as a spider medicine. Navajo used the seeds as a appetite stimulant. The Paiute tribe used sunflower root to alleviate rheumatism. Zuni would make a poultice from the root to treat snakebites.



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico





Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico



Wild sunflowers along roadside in New Mexico


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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

Jun. 1st, 2012

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Brisbane River



Brisbane River


Queensland, Australia


The Brisbane River quickly became home to me during my Australian travels in the Summer of 2011. It was home to the HMB Endeavour, upon which in May I was a volunteer tour guide and crew member while it was in port at the Brisbane City Center and during its circumnavigation voyage leg from Brisbane to Gladstone. I found the river as it flowed through Brisbane to be a hub of cultural activities from outdoor recreation, panoramic scenery, cultural events, to botanical garden goodness. It was also a hot spot for transportation to and from work while I was living in Manly West and the West End. The Brisbane River is the longest river in southeastern Queensland, flowing through the metropolitan hub of Brisbane before it empties into the Moreton Bay. It was named after Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales, in 1823 by John Oxley who was the first European to navigate and explore the river. Its mouth at Moreton Bay did however get visited by Captain Cook, Matthew Flinders, John Bingle and, William Edwardson, all whom failed to discover the river. After the river was given this name, so was named the penal colony that once habitated the lands where metropolitan Brisbane now stands. This amazing river will astound you with beauty and richness as it is a major waterway between Brisbane and Ipswich. The River from afar in its contrasted beauty shimmering reflections of skyscrapers and modern architecture unfortunately is quite murky, dark, and polluted within its depths. It comes from Mount Stanley, 214 miles away, dammed at Wivenhoe Dam to form Lake Wivenhoe which is the water supply for the city. The river is known to be abundant with the rare Queensland lungfish, Brisbane River cod, and bull sharks. The river has 16 major bridges crossing it, as well as the Clem Jones Tunnel which was built in 2010 to go underneath it . It is a hub of activity as personal watercrafts, large ocean vessels, ferries, yachts, and historic ships travel this waterfare. The River sees alot of commuter traffic on the River CityCat.

The largest ship ever to be built on the river was a 66,000 ton beast done so by Robert Miller, though was un-moored by the 1974 Brisbane flood, one of the most devastatingly damaging floods in the river’s history. The River historically flooded severely numerous times in 1893, 1974, and most recently in January of 2011. The river has expanded its port facilities, especially that on the historic “Fisherman’s Island” which is now known as the “Port of Brisbane”.

The Brisbane river is fed from the Brisbane Mountain Range that is east of Kingaroy. The River proceeds south past Mount Stanley, through the Moore and Toogoolawah townships where the Stanley River meets with the river, then runs into Lake Wivenhoe, eastward to merge with Bremer River, on into Brisbane including Jindalee, Indooroopilly, and Toowong. Within Brisbane, the River goes under the Kangaroo Point Cliffs, a quarry area that is a scenic spot for the River, and a popular location for parties, drum circles, and other outings. The River is also fed by other tributaries besides the above such as Breakfast Creek, Moggill Creek, Bulimba Creek, Norman Creek, Oxley Creek, Lockyer Creek, Cressbrook Creek, Cooyar Creek, Cubberla Creek, Wolston Creek, Woogaroo Creek, Goodna Creek, Six Mile Creek, Bundamba Creek, Pullen Pullen Creek, and Kholo Creek.

Pre-contact, the river was very popular among the Aboriginal peoples of the Turrbal nation as a location for fishing and fire stick farming. After Contact, with explorations by Captain Cook, Matthew Flinders, John Bingle, and William Edwardson of the area, first being missed by them. It was however discovered by Western settlers in 1823 when convicts sailing from Sydney on a timber retrieval mission to Illawarra were blown north by a storm stranding on Moreton Island. They escaped by making it to the mainland after going south of the Brisbane River. As they were heading home north back to Sydney, they discovered the river, by walking upstream along its banks for almost a month before making their first crossing at “Canoe Reach” where it junctions with Oxley Creek by stealing a small canoe from the Aborigines. At the same time, John Oxley was sailing into Moreton Bay looking for the prime location for a new convict settlement when he discovered the stranded men. In 1823, the river was named after Sir Thomas Brisbane the then governor of New South Wales and saw its first settlement in 1824 on its shores. The first private wharves were built in 1848 and then the first shark-proof river baths established in 1857 at Kangaroo Point. River dredged in 1862 for navigation requirements. Because of the early settlement of Brisbane water quality deteriorated to a level that several public baths could no longer source water from the river. Even to the 1930′s the water was remarked as clear, and swimming in the river was still very popular. But as Brisbane grew, the river clarity worsened and became likened to a sewer and waste dump. A River walk was established and restoration of the river was seen in the later end of the 20th century. Even by 2000, the Brisbane River did not meet environmental standard guidelines. In 2008 river quality still not seen healthy with murky waters and no longer recommending swimming in the waters. In addition, bull sharks have made their home in the river causing much more dangers, being home to numerous shark attacks and deaths.



Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).


These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?













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May. 2nd, 2012

Vargo

Jeanie Johnston


Jeanie Johnston
Dublin, Ireland

One of Ireland’s most famous ships is the Jeanie Johnston which is moored off the Custom House Quay in Dublin along the River Liffey. It is a replica of the three masted barque that was originally built in 1847 by Scotsman John Munn in Quebec, Canada. The original ship was bought by the Tralee merchants John Donovan and Sons from Kerry County as a cargo vessel that traded between Tralee and North America for many years bringing emigrants from Ireland to North America and timber back to Europe. Her first maiden emigrant voyage went from Blennerville in Kerry to Quebec in 1848 with 193 emigrants on board due to the Potato Famine that ravaged Ireland. From 1848 until 1855 she made 16 voyages to Quebec, Baltimore, and New York. On average the trip was accomplished in 47 days and her largest number of passengers were 254. No crews or passengers were ever lost on board thanks to the captain James Attridge who would not overload the ship and made sure doctor Richard Blennerhassett was on board for every journey. In 1855 the ship was sold to William Johnson of North Shields in England, but during a 1858 trip to Quebec from Hull carrying timber became waterlogged and slowly sank – crew was rescued by the Dutch ship Sophie Elizabeth. This replica ship, is reduced in size by 30%, and is only licensed to carry 40 people. The replica was made from indepth research of the original, and took from 1993-2002 to build. It was constructed by a international team of young people who linked Ireland North and South, the U.S., Canada, and other countries costing approximately 16 million Euro (4 times the original estimate of 3.81 million Euro) which was paid for by the Irish government, Kerry County Council, Tralee Town Council, the European Union, the American Ireland Fund, Bord Failte, Shannon Development, Kerry Group, the Training and Employment Authority Foras Áiseanna Saothair and the Irish Department of the Marine, most of which later agreed to write off their losses. It was built with larch planks on oak frames and was altered to apply with current international maritime regulations by adding some modern concessions including two Caterpillar main engines, two Caterpillar generators, and an emergency generator that is located above the waterline in the forward deckhouse fully compliant to the highest standards of modern ocean-going passenger ships, with steel water-tight bulkheads, down-flooding valves, and fire-fighting equipment. The replica shiped sailed in 2003 from Tralee to Canada and to the U.S. She raced in the 2005 tall ships race and finished 60th out of 65 from Waterford to Cherbourg. The replica is owned by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority who bought it in 2005 for 2.7 million Euro. Today it is not in seagoing condition. Today she is primarily used as an Onboard Museum and evening venue.




Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum



 


 



 




 



Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum


Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).


These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?













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Originally published at Naturally Science & Lore

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